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Posts Tagged ‘Awards’

decorated books

In Literature on June 22, 2010 at 12:35 pm

Online literary magazine, The Millions, have released their annual Prizewinners 2009/2010 list. A sort of “hall of fame” of literary award winners, the list is an aggregation of shortlisted and winning books from six major awards since 1995. The rankings are established by awarding three points for a winner, and two points for a finalist, from the following awards: Booker Prize (B), National Book Critics Circle Award (C), International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award (I), National Book Award (N), Pulitzer Prize (P), Costa Book Award (W, formerly the Whitbread).

Rank Year Title Author Awards
11 2003 The Known World Edward P. Jones C, I, N, P
9 2001 The Corrections Jonathan Franzen C, I, N, P
8 2009 Wolf Hall Hilary Mantel B, C, W
8 2007 The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao Junot Díaz C, P, I
8 1997 Underworld Don DeLillo C, I, N, P
7 2005 The March E.L. Doctorow C, N, P
7 2004 Line of Beauty Alan Hollinghurst B, C, W
7 2002 Middlesex Jeffrey Eugenides I, N, P
7 2001 Atonement Ian McEwan B, C, W
7 1998 The Hours Michael Cunningham C, I, P
7 1997 Last Orders Graham Swift B, I, W
7 1997 Quarantine Jim Crace B, I, W
6 2009 Home Marilynn Robinson C, N, I
6 2005 The Inheritance of Loss Kiran Desai B, C
6 2004 Gilead Marilynn Robinson C, P
5 2008 The Secret Scripture Sebastian Barry B, W
5 2008 Olive Kitteridge Elizabeth Strout C, P
5 2007 Tree of Smoke Denis Johnson N, P
5 2006 The Road Cormac McCarthy C, P
5 2006 The Echo Maker Richard Powers N, P
5 2005 Europe Central William T. Vollmann C, N
5 2005 The Accidental Ali Smith B, W
5 2004 The Master Colm Toibin B, I
5 2003 The Great Fire Shirley Hazzard I, N
5 2001 True History of the Kelly Gang Peter Carey B, I
5 2000 The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay Michael Chabon C, P
5 2000 The Blind Assassin Margaret Atwood B, I
5 1999 Waiting Ha Jin N, P
5 1999 Disgrace J.M. Coetzee B, C
5 1999 Being Dead Jim Crace C, W
5 1998 Charming Billy Alice McDermott I, N
5 1997 American Pastoral Philip Roth C, P
5 1996 Every Man for Himself Beryl Bainbridge B, W
5 1996 Martin Dressler: The Tale of an American Dreamer Steven Millhauser N, P
5 1995 The Moor’s Last Sigh Salman Rushdie B, W
5 1995 The Ghost Road Pat Barker B, W
5 1995 Independence Day Richard Ford C, P
5 1995 Sabbath’s Theater Philip Roth N, P

face down

In Art on March 20, 2010 at 6:15 pm

Portrait prize fever is hotting up for 2010, but according to early reviews, the finalists for this year’s Archibald Prize are nothing to get excited about. Following the announcement of the Packing Room Prize on Wednesday, the Sydney Morning Herald’s John McDonald and The Australian’s Christopher Allen lamented the lack of quality among this year’s offerings. Head packer Steve Peters’ pick, a black and white portrait of rock historian Glenn A. Baker by Sydney artist, Nasifa, is an example, they say, of the oversized, photo-realistic pieces that seem to dominate the selection to year, and McDonald points out “‘bigger’ does not necessarily mean ‘better'”.

That said, there are a few artistic gems that stand out as early favorites. Alexander McKenzie’s Andrew Upton is rowing a boat through shallow, rocky water, a cheeky grin and caricature-sized nose on his face. A wry depiction of the STC’s co-director, who along with wife, St. Cate, has enjoyed sensational success since taking the helm.

Nigel Milsom’s Adam Cullen (bird as prophet) dresses the renowned enfant terrible in black hooded robes, a black bird perched on his hand.

But who will win? Allen suggests that using the judges’ (apparent) criteria – size, publicity potential, and artistic merit (a bonus) – the obvious answer is Craig Ruddy’s The prince of darkness – Warwick Thornton. I tend to agree: his 2004 winning portrait of David Gulpilill had similar merits, as did last year’s winner, Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu by Guy Maestri – note the appeal of an Indigenous subject. And after Thornton’s success with Samson & Delilah last year, perhaps he has the celebrity factor to snag the People’s Choice Prize.

The finalists can be viewed now on the Archibald Prize 2010 website, and will be on display at the Art Gallery of New South Wales from 27 March – 30 May.

lost lit

In Literature on February 2, 2010 at 8:50 am

A Booker Prize for Patrick White? Forty years after its publication, his novel, The Vivisector, has been longlisted for a one-off “Lost Booker”.

The award aims to commemorate the works that missed out in 1970 after changes to the Man Booker Prize rules. A panel of three judges will select a shortlist of six from the longlist, to be announced in March, and the reading public will decide the winner by voting on the Man Booker website. The longlist includes another Australian author, Shirley Hazzard, for her novel, The Bay Of Noon.

The longlist…

Brian Aldiss, The Hand Reared Boy
HE Bates, A Little Of What You Fancy?
Nina Bawden, The Birds On The Trees
Melvyn Bragg, A Place In England
Christy Brown, Down All The Days
Len Deighton, Bomber
JG Farrell, Troubles
Elaine Feinstein, The Circle
Shirley Hazzard, The Bay Of Noon
Reginald Hill, A Clubbable Woman
Susan Hill, I’m The King Of The Castle
Francis King, A Domestic Animal
Margaret Laurence, The Fire Dwellers
David Lodge, Out Of The Shelter
Iris Murdoch, A Fairly Honourable Defeat
Shiva Naipaul, Fireflies
Patrick O’Brian, Master and Commander
Joe Orton, Head To Toe
Mary Renault, Fire From Heaven
Ruth Rendell, A Guilty Thing Surprised
Muriel Spark, The Driver’s Seat
Patrick White, The Vivisector

nine nominations, eight hours long

In Theatre on December 29, 2009 at 10:27 pm

Leading the nominees for the 2009 Sydney Theatre Awards is the epic eight-hour Sydney Theatre Company/Sydney Festival production of The War of the Roses. The final work of the STC Actors Company, it has received nine nominations, including Best Mainstage Production, Best Director (Benedict Andrews), Best Actress in a Leading Role (Cate Blanchett), Best Actress in a Leading Role (Pamela Rabe), Best Actor in a Leading Role (Ewen Leslie), Best Actor in a Supporting Role (John Gaden), Best Set Design (Robert Cousins), Best Costume Design (Alice Babidge) and Best Lighting Design (Nick Schlieper).

The Sydney Theatre Company productions A Streetcar Named Desire and When the Rain Stops Falling picked up five and six nomination, marking a prosperous year under new artistic directors, Cate Blanchett and Andrew Upton.

The Awards, to be presented on Monday January 18, 2010, are run by a group of theatre critics to recognise achievement in theatre in Sydney. The panel consists of Jason Blake (Sydney Morning Herald), Deborah Jones (The Australian), Alex Lalak (Daily Telegraph), Jo Litson (The Sunday Telegraph), John McCallum (The Australian), Diana Simmonds (Stagenoise) and John Shand (Sydney Morning Herald).

And the nominees are…

BEST MAINSTAGE PRODUCTION

Happy Days (Company B)
A Streetcar Named Desire (Sydney Theatre Company)
The War of the Roses (Sydney Theatre Company and Sydney Festival)
When the Rain Stops Falling (Sydney Theatre Company and Brink Productions)

BEST INDEPENDENT PRODUCTION

Beyond the Neck (Bambina Borracha Productions in association with B Sharp)
The Bougainville Photoplay Project (Version 1.0 in association with the Tamarama Rock Surfers)
Norm & Ahmed/ Shafana & Aunt Sarrinah (Alex Buzo Company)
The Only Child (The Hayloft Project in association with B Sharp)

BEST DIRECTION

Benedict Andrews (The City)
Benedict Andrews (The War of the Roses)
Chris Drummond (When the Rain Stops Falling)
Marion Potts (Venus and Adonis)

BEST ACTRESS IN A LEAD ROLE
Cate Blanchett (A Streetcar Named Desire)
Cate Blanchett (The War of the Roses)
Julie Forsyth (Happy Days)
Pamela Rabe (The War of the Roses)

BEST ACTOR IN A LEAD ROLE

Joel Edgerton (A Streetcar Named Desire)
Darren Gilshenan (Strange Attractor)
Ewen Leslie (The War of the Roses)
Ben Winspear (Baghdad Wedding)

BEST ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

Blazey Best (Strange Attractor)
Anita Hegh (The City)
Kris McQuade (When the Rain Stops Falling)
Kerry Walker (The Man From Mukinupin)

BEST ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

Gareth Davies (The Only Child)
John Gaden (The War of the Roses)
Yalin Ozucelik (Baghdad Wedding)
Tim Richards (A Streetcar Named Desire)

BEST NEW AUSTRALIAN WORK

Beyond the Neck (Tom Holloway)
The Only Child (Simon Stone with Thomas Henning)
Savage River (Steve Rodgers)
When the Rain Stops Falling (Andrew Bovell)

BEST NEWCOMER

Travis Cardona (Savage River)
Josh McConville (The Call + Strange Attractor)
Susie Mathers (Mamma Mia!)

BEST SET DESIGN

Robert Cousins (The War of the Roses)
Michael Scott Mitchell (Travesties)
Anna Tregloan (Venis and Adonis)
Hossein Valamanesh (When the Rain Stops Falling)

BEST COSTUME DESIGN

Alice Babidge (War of the Roses)
Julie Lynch (Travesties)
Bruce McKinven (The Alchemist)
Tess Schofield (The Wonderful World of Dissocia)

BEST LIGHTING DESIGN

Paul Jackson (Happy Days)
Paul Jackson (The Telltale Heart)
Niklas Pajanti (When the Rain Stops Falling)
Nick Schlieper (The War of the Roses)

BEST SCORE OR SOUND DESIGN

Paul Charlier (A Streetcar Named Desire)
David Franzke (The Wonderful World of Dissocia)
Alan John (The City)

BEST PRODUCTION OF A MUSICAL

Avenue Q
Chicago
Jerry Springer The Opera
Wicked

JUDITH JOHNSON AWARD FOR BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MUSICAL

Lucy Durack (Wicked)
Amanda Harrison (Wicked)
Sharon Millerchip (Chicago)
Caroline O’Connor (Chicago)

JUDITH JOHNSON AWARD FOR BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MUSICAL

Damien Bermingham (Chicago)
Mitchell Butel (Avenue Q)
Luke Joslin (Avenue Q)
James Millar (Gutenberg the Musical)

BEST CABARET PRODUCTION

Red Hot and Saucy – Rhonda Burchmore (Civic Cabaret)
Meow to the World: Crisis is Born (Sydney Opera House)
‘Tegrity: Britney Spears in Cabaret – Christie Whelan (Raval)
Tim Draxl – Under the Influence (Supper Club)

BEST PRODUCTION FOR CHILDREN

The Gruffalo (Christine Dunstan Productions)
The Nargun and the Stars (Erth and Sydney Festival)
The Wizard of Oz (Windmill and Sydney Theatre Company)